development of public recreation in Canada
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development of public recreation in Canada

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Published by Canadian parks/Recreation Association in Ottawa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Recreation -- Canada -- History

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementElsie Marie McFarland.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGV55 M24 1978
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 116 p. :
Number of Pages116
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22348810M

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Guidelines for developing public recreation facility standards. [Peterborough: Ontario Audio Library Service, ] Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Ontario. Sports and Fitness Division. OCLC Number: Notes: Cover title. Description: committee on public parks in , the Committee on Public Walks and Gardens, effectively becoming Canada's first parks and recreation department, it wasn’t until that the first park and recreation department was created in Nova Scotia (Karlis, ; Markham-Starr, ). Recreation has had a varied role in community : Amber Gebhardt. • All aspects of life were integrated (work, play, leisure, recreation, and religion all interconnected) o Hunting and fishing for survival and pleasure o Physical fitness was an important part of survival • Value placed on the relationship between mind, body, and spirit • Inuit. Canada - Canada - Sports and recreation: Canadians participate in a wide array of sports and other recreational activities. Sports play an important role in the Canadian school system, largely the result of the country’s well-coordinated network of governmental and nongovernmental agencies devoted to physical education. Several of the sports played in Canada are derived from those of the.

Whether as individuals or as part of team, Canadians are making use of culture, recreation and sport infrastructure to stay active and have fun. Our survey included several types of culture, recreation and sport facilities: Ice arena facilities: Indoor ice arenas with pads or more, outdoor ice arenas. The Framework for Recreation in Canada is our pathway to that goal. The Framework for Recreation in Canada is the guiding document for public recreation providers in Canada. We have an opportunity to work together in ways that will enable all Canadians to enjoy recreation and outdoor experiences in supportive physical and social environments.   The development of new trails that promote accessibility to attract a greater variety of users. The rehabilitation or development of: trails that incorporate identified Indigenous cultural or heritage values; connector trails; trailside and trailhead recreation facilities e.g. signs, washrooms, picnic tables, benches, gazebos, garbage cans and huts. This collection provides a timely look at park management and planning in Canada by bringing together scholars from the fields of geography and recreation studies as well as officials in Canada's public service and non-governmental organizations. Divided into sections dealing with theoretical approaches and their application, case studies, and the larger themes in park management and planning.

  The Historical Development of Recreation 1. Click through the slides to learn about each time period 2. Ancient Greece Because of the influence of Ancient Greece on Western civilization, it is important to understand how 3. Ancient Rome Ancient Romans . Parks, Forestry and Recreation would like to thank all of the many individuals and groups who contributed their time, resources, and ideas to the development of the Recreation Service Plan. Particular thanks goes to those who participated in the public and stakeholder consultations or responded to the online survey. Our community partners. History Timeline document. In preparation for the first poster session at the annual TRO conference, , I was asked to share a visual summary of the timelines of the development of TR in Canada created by a 4th year, University of Waterloo Therapeutic Recreation student, Kelly McKinnon. Canada. This publication can be made available on request. in a variety of alternative formats. For further information or to obtain additional copies, please contact: Publications Health Canada Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 Tel.: () Fax: () E-Mail: [email protected]